A Quick and Easy Guide to Understanding California Employment Law | Employee Rights Law Firm

Jun 1, 2022
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Employment Law Book

A Quick and Easy Guide to Understanding California Employment Law

If you’re employed in California, it’s important to know and understand your rights under state law. Employment law governs the relationship between employers and employees, and sets forth certain protections and rights for workers. This guide will give you a quick overview of some of the key provisions of California employment law.

Discrimination: California law prohibits discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, ancestry, physical or mental disability, medical condition (including cancer and genetic characteristics), marital status, sexual orientation, age (40 and over), pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions. If you believe you have been the victim of workplace discrimination, you should contact an experienced attorney who can evaluate your case.

Harassment: California law prohibits harassment in the workplace on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, ancestry, physical or mental disability, medical condition (including cancer and genetic characteristics), marital status, sexual orientation, age (40 and over), pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions. Harassment can include conduct that is verbal, physical, or visual. If you believe you have been the victim of workplace harassment, you should contact an experienced attorney who can evaluate your case.

Wage and Hour Laws: California has a number of laws regulating wages and hours worked. For example, employees must be paid at least the minimum wage for all hours worked. Employees must also be paid overtime for all hours worked over eight in a day or 40 in a week (with some exceptions). If you believe your employer has violated California’s wage and hour laws, you should contact an experienced attorney who can evaluate your case.

Leave Laws: California law provides employees with certain rights to take leave from work for medical or family reasons. For example, employees may be entitled to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave per year for a serious medical condition, or up to six weeks of paid leave per year for the birth or adoption of a child. If you believe your employer has denied you the right to take legally-protected leave, you should contact an experienced attorney who can evaluate your case.

These are just a few of the key provisions of California employment law. If you have any questions about your rights in the workplace, you should contact an experienced attorney.

An attorney can help you understand your rights under the law and determine whether you have a claim against your employer. Contacting an attorney is always the best way to ensure that your rights are protected.